Archive for EPD – Page 2

be inspired by studying (practicing) economic and political development

In the Economic and Political Development (EPD) Concentration, second-year students recently returned from their January field travel for the Workshop in Development Practice.  Through the workshop – which is the capstone course for EPD students – 21 teams of students are working with a diverse range of development organizations in 17 countries.

Lamia Bazir and Aura Martinez spent two weeks in Niger with Transparency International’s national chapter.  For their project, which is supporting Transparency’s efforts to involve more women in their anti-corruption activities, they met with women leaders from politics, the judiciary and civil society, as well as engaging with women’s groups, local authorities and religious leaders in rural areas.  Other members of their team will travel in March to Zimbabwe to conduct similar fieldwork with the Transparency chapter there.

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Also in January, Yigit Canay, Rachana Kumar and Alissa Sevrioukova traveled  to Cambodia to work with their client, Open Development Cambodia, which is the only open data platform available in the Mekong Subregion.    To help ODC develop a “donor and development assistance” section of their website, the three students meet with the ODC team as well as donors and local NGOs.   Other members of the SIPA team will travel back to Cambodia in March to present their proposals to ODC.

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Meanwhile, Mashael AlShalan, Aliya Shalabekova and Liang Zhao traveled to Kazakhstan to meet with their clients at the National Agency for Technological Development and the Ministry of Economy and Budget Planning, as well as other government and private sector stakeholders.   These meetings laid the groundwork for the team’s analysis and recommendations on the development of small and medium-sized enterprises in Kazakhstan.

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All of the EPD workshop teams will present the main results of their work during a two-day workshop at SIPA on May 1 and 2.  The schedule of presentations will be posted on SIPA’s online events calendar by early April.  The presentations will be open to the public, and prospective students are especially welcome to attend.

 

Kick Start the Semester

There is something going on all the time at SIPA, this week is no different (classes begin today).

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014

The Sustainability Essentials Training Program (SET) Online Information Session (DETAILS)

12:30 pm to 1:15 pm Online

Sponsor: The Earth Institute

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014

The Relationship Between the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the African Union: What Went Wrong?

A panel discussion with Ambassador Charles Ntwaagae, Permanent Representative of Botswana; Ambassador Macharia Kamau, Permanent Representative of Kenya; and Ambassador Christian Wenaweser, Permanent Representative of Liechtenstein, former President of the Assembly of State Parties to the Rome Statute of the ICC.  (DETAILS)

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Sponsor: UN Studies Program

 

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

Establishing Effective Labor Oversight in Honduras

Holly Hammonds, Co-Founder of GlobalWorks Foundation and Member of Honduras Labor Framework Oversight Committee, and Jeff Hermanson, Director of Global Strategies, Workers United and Member of Honduras Labor Framework Oversight Committee, will discuss their labor standards project in Honduras.  (DETAILS)

12:45 pm to 1:50 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 802

Sponsor: Economic and Political Development Concentration

 

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014

Reception for SIPA Dean Janow in London

SIPA Dean Merit E. Janow cordially invites you to a reception for SIPA alumni and other invited guests in London. Join us to welcome the new dean and hear what the future holds for SIPA.  (DETAILS)

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Waldorf Hilton, Aldwych WC2B 4DD, United Kingdom

Sponsor: Office of Alumni Affairs

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

CGEG: Challenges to Democracy and Rule of Law in Central Europe – A Lecture by Gordon Bajnai, Former Prime Minister of Hungary

Lecture by Gordon Bajnai, Former Prime Minister of Hungary and Leader of Together 2014 Electoral Alliance; with Victoria de Grazia, Blinken European Institute, Columbia University; Jan Svejnar, Center on Global Economic Governance, Columbia University; and Alan H. Timberlake, East Central European Center, Columbia University. Registration required.   (DETAILS)

3:30 pm to 5:30 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1512

Sponsor: Center on Global Economic Governance

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

Women, Soft Power, and the New Diplomacy: From the Cold War to Hillary Clinton

As political leaders increasingly rely on dialogue and normative power versus sanctions and warfare in inter-state relations, women have risen to the forefront of international affairs. A panel of diplomats, military officers, and historians will investigate the accelerating use of soft-power solutions in diplomacy and female leaders’ role in the trend.  (DETAILS)

6:00 pm to 8:00 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Sponsor: European Institute

 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014

BP Global Energy Outlook 2035

A presentation by Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP. (DETAILS)

6:00 pm to 7:30 pm at Faculty House, 4th Floor Skyline Room

Sponsor: Center on Global Energy Policy

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Nuclear Weapons Effects, Proliferation and Policy

An event with Col. Robert Spalding, United States Air Force, on the Air Force’s nuclear enterprise to include ICBMs and Bombers, as well as briefly discussing submarines.  (DETAILS)

12:15 pm to 2:00 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1302

Sponsor: Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Turkey and the EU: The Future of a Complicated Relationship

Meltem Müftüler-Baç is Professor of International Relations and Jean Monnet chair at Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey and an Affiliate Professor at the University of Stockholm from 2013 to 2016. (DETAILS)

4:00 pm to 6:00 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1512

Sponsor: European Institute

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Nuclear After Fukushima: Policies, Practices, and Problems

A public lecture by Lady Barbara Judge CBE, Former Chairman of the UK Atomic Energy Authority and currently Deputy Chairman of TEPCO’s Nuclear Reform Monitoring Committee and head of its task force on nuclear safety.  (DETAILS)

5:30 pm to 6:45 pm at Faculty House, 4th Floor Skyline Room

Sponsor: Center on Global Energy Policy

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014

Russian Law and Judicial Reform: Think Again

Kimberly Marten will chair a panel discussion with Timothy Frye, Kathryn Hendley, William Partlett, and Maria Popova on Russian law and judicial reform.  (DETAILS)

6:00 pm to 7:00 pm in the International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Sponsor: Harriman Institute

 

Think EPD is your thing?

What does it actually mean to do development at SIPA?

Would you like to work in developing countries? Are you interested in improving people’s quality of life and access to resources?

If you think this is your “thing” then Economic and Political Development (EPD) is your concentration. This is one of the six policy concentrations offered at SIPA and the largest one with almost 250 students. Through this program, students are prepared for careers in international development through classes and projects that provide them with an understanding of the processes of economic, political, and social change in the developing world.

Having said that, we know development is a broad concept and it might entail completely different tasks, especially in the work field. You could be doing anything from consulting on a microfinance project in Uganda to working in a gender equality campaign with the UN Women in Peru. Taking into account the number of options and different realities in the developing world, how does SIPA focus its EPD program and who are the so-called “EPDers” (students who pursue this concentration)?

One of the unique aspects of the program is that, along with the economic and political requirements, it allows you to choose one of the four professional tracks: economic development, political development, social development or sustainable development. The goal of these tracks is to help you navigate and narrow your interests in the world of development so you have a better idea of the type of work you would like to do afterwards. In terms of classes, they are focused on technical skills, like design and implementation of projects, and in analysis of the political, social and economic realities of developing countries. Another key part of the program is the Capstone Project (final graduation project), which allows you to work with an actual client anywhere in the world, develop and execute a development project and yes, travel to the field to see it.

We, the EPDers, are as heterogeneous and diverse as it gets; with students from all countries and backgrounds. You could be coming from the developing field, or trying to enter it, there is a place for everybody. Our faculty is comprised by top leaders in the field, one example being the Director of the Program Jose Antonio Ocampo. Additionally, we have access to resources focused on development issues like  The Center on Economic Governance, the student led Columbia Partnership for International Development and the Microfinance Working Group.

What I did this summer

I spent my summer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. My professional and academic interests are on politics and development in Latin America, particularly on innovation in the public sector. My decision to spend my summer in Rio de Janeiro came as a mixture of academic and personal curiosity. On one side, I was familiar with some of the innovation efforts been carried out by the Secretary of Education of Rio and I was eager to learn more about their programs. On the other side, despite its political and economic importance for Latin America I knew very little about Brazil. Hence, the offer to intern at the Secretary of Education of the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro came just in time and I was ready to depart to my destination.

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The Secretary of Education of the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro (SME) is in charge of the municipal red of schools of Rio de Janeiro, that is, a total of 1.076 schools including kinder garden and elementary level, with 633.449 students enrolled and 42.536 teachers. The challenges of the public system are numerous and diverse, especially for the schools located in dangerous areas.

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In order to improve the quality of education in public schools and the quality of life of the communities where they are located, the current Secretary of Education, Claudia Costín, along with her team started to implement several very interesting initiatives. One of these initiatives, for which I had the opportunity to work, is Escolas do Amanhã, which was created for schools that were in favelas recently pacified. Given the weak presence of the government in these communities, the program changed the structure of these schools to include services that supported the community, like health and parenting services.

Another unique program currently in place is called GENTE, which promotes a new concept of school that fully integrates the new educational technologies and places the student in the center of the learning process. The pilot school for the program is called Escola Municipal Andre Uraní and it is located in Rocinha, the biggest favela of Rio. I also had the opportunity of working with the team from GENTE, visit the pilot school and learn some of the philosophy behind their model. In the case of GENTE, all the students are given a laptop computer through which they do most of their learning. This is possible thanks to Educopédia, an online platform of digital classrooms where students learn the curriculum while teachers follow their progress and evaluation, also included in the platform.

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I spend a total of two months and a half in Rio de Janeiro. The internship was inspiring and very interesting, as it was the rest of experience in the country. The city is beyond beautiful, the culture is vibrant, the juices are natural and the beaches are amazing. I was lucky enough to be in Rio during the Confederation Coup, the visit of the Pope and the starting of the protests that are still taking place all over Brazil. It was a great summer indeed.

 

Posted by Giuliana Irene Carducci Sanchez, 2-Year SIPA MPA, concentrating in EPD with specialization in Management

 

Economic and Political Development (EPD) concentration 101

The Economic and Political Development (EPD) concentration attracts diverse students from around the world who are committed to fighting inequality between and within countries, eradicating poverty and its causes, and promoting inclusive growth and human development by expanding people’s civil and political as well as economic and social rights and freedoms. To take on these global challenges, EPD curriculum equips students with a variety of skills in policy analysis, program planning, monitoring and evaluation, and advocacy. Through an interdisciplinary package of courses, workshop projects, and practical internships, students acquire both a broader understanding of the processes of economic, political and social change in the developing world as well as a more focused competence in specific fields such as microfinance, small business and social enterprise development, corporate social responsibility, gender and development, education policy, public health, sustainable development, post-conflict reconstruction and governance.

One of the most exciting opportunities within the EPD concentration is the Workshop in Development Practice, through which students gain practical experience by engaging in on-going cutting-edge development projects, often involving country fieldwork. Working in teams with a faculty supervisor, students assist a variety of clients on a wide array of assignments in international development. Students take a multidisciplinary approach to their work and learn extensively from each other as well as from the hands-on tasks of the workshop itself. A list of past workshop projects can be viewed at the following link: http://new.sipa.columbia.edu/academics/capstone-workshops/epd#top_info.

The EPD concentration is dedicated to enhancing students’ overall experience at SIPA. We sponsor a number of events throughout each academic year. This includes social events, such as the annual EPD retreat, happy hours, cultural trips around the city or off-campus parties; brown bag talks and evening lectures with practitioners and academics; and career events such as internship and alumni panels. We regularly collaborate with other concentrations, student groups and regional institutes to address the wide array of interests among our EPD students.

EPD graduates are uniquely prepared for careers in international development. They seek leadership positions in the nonprofit, public and private sectors and pursue opportunities in development consulting, microfinance, small business and social enterprise development, corporate social responsibility, gender and development, education policy, public health, sustainable development, post-conflict reconstruction, governance and/or capacity development. EPD works very closely with SIPA’s Office of Career Services to provide a comprehensive support to our students. A sample of employers who hired EPD graduates is available here http://new.sipa.columbia.edu/careers/employment-statistics/career-paths-by-concentration.

 

"The most global public policy school, where an international community of students and faculty address world challenges."

—Merit E. Janow, Dean, SIPA, Professor of Practice, International and Economic Law and International Affairs

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