Archive for APSIA

Where we’ve been, and where we’ll be

The SIPA Pan-African Network (SPAN) hosted a mixer in Lagos last week, and I thought it’d be a good time to update y’all on where SIPA will be the next few weeks. Thanks to Theotis Sharpe MPA-DP ’20 for his work in putting this together – you may remember him from the SIPA Story Slam event he co-organized

As a reminder, the SIPA application will go live this month. While we’ll be providing tips on this blog throughout the process, I encourage you to search through our archives for useful information from people who have gone through this process (or are on the other side of this process!).

There will be a Columbia SIPA Networking Mixer in Accra on August 10, where prospective students, current students, and alumni will connect and discuss what life at the world’s most global policy school is like. RSVP here.

SIPA will be at the upcoming APSIA graduate fairs. These events are an excellent way to meet not just SIPA, but to explore what other international affair and policy schools can offer. In any case, we look forward to meeting you and giving you information on the programs, curriculum, and admissions process.

APSIA Graduate Fair: Atlanta, GA
September 12, 2019, from 6 – 8pm
Register here.

APSIA Graduate Fair: Toronto
September 17, 2019 from 6 – 8pm
Register here.

APSIA Graduate Fair: New York City
September 18, 2019 from 5:15 – 9pm
Register here.

APSIA Graduate Fair: Washington, D.C.
September 19, 2019, from 6 – 8pm
Register here.

We’ll continue updating our recruiting calendar throughout the next few weeks. If you’re in the New York area, I highly encourage you to attend an Information Sessions. Preparation will be helpful as you start your graduate school journey!

Is this the year you’re applying to graduate school?

Is this the year you’re applying to graduate school? Even if it’s not, we recommend you connect with schools that you’re interested in early on. Graduate school applications can be time-consuming to gather all of the pieces for, especially if you’re juggling several applications on top of your personal and professional life. You also want to make sure that the program you apply to is the best fit for your goals.

Columbia SIPA will be participating in the APSIA Online Grad School fair on July 25. Register today to learn more about what you can do with a SIPA graduate degree – our alumni work in everything from international trade policy to counter-terrorism to social impact investing (and much more).

APSIA stands for the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, a network of schools that demonstrate their excellence in career-focused, graduate-level, international affairs education. APSIA schools generally stress the application of theory to practical uses and are focused on helping students become meaningful agents of change. APSIA has a robust list of relevant Fellowships & Scholarships for those interested in policy and international affair graduate studies.

If you’re in the area, stop by the Summerfest mini graduate fairs coming up this month. SIPA alumni, current students and admissions staff will be here to answer your questions.

Summerfest New York City
July 17 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm
International Affairs Building, Columbia University
420 West 118th Street, Room 1501
New York, NY 10027

Summerfest Washington, D.C. (July)
July 24 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm
Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies
1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

As a reminder, the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid is closing early today and will be closed tomorrow in observance of U.S. Independence Day.

APSIA, G4, and Connecting With Us

I’m preparing for a webinar right now with colleagues from several peer instutitions along the East Coast (The G4: Columbia SIPA, Georgetown MSFS, Tufts Fletcher, and Johns Hopkins SAIS), and I wanted to remind our blog readers about opportunities to connect with not just us at Columbia, but a variety of other great policy schools and graduate opportunities.

First, let’s explain the acronyms and names. The G4 (Group of 4 schools) are part of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA). APSIA has many affiliated policy schools, but the G4 schools have been travling together to inform students about educational and career opportunities in international affairs for more than 40 years.

APSIA itself has a fantastic list of Fellowships & Scholarships, and their website lists a variety of global events where you can learn more about a graduate degree in international affairs. Last year Columbia SIPA attended APSIA events in Madrid, Paris, London, as well as a variety of places across the U.S.

It’s never too early to start thinking about entering a career tackling political, social, and economic challenges in the world. Even if you’re not planning on applying to graduate school this year, tap in APSIA and these other resources earlier. Reach out to us at SIPA, as well! Graduate school applications can be quite thorough and time-consuming to complete, especially if you’re applying to several schools at once, so it never hurts to prepare early.

As a quick update on what Columbia SIPA is up to, we have a few final webinars for admitted students coming up (check them out in the Welcome Portal!). The school year is winding down too, and SIPA students are barreling towards graduation in just a few weeks. Let us know what’s been on with you — I’m assuming it includes Beyonce and Game of Thrones, at the very least.

Opinion: 4 ways to bring human rights into development work (via APSIA)

We’re resharing this post by the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA), originally posted here.

APSIA brings leading graduate schools around the world which specialize in international affairs – including SIPA! We’ll be at the APSIA graduate fairs in Madrid, Paris and London this week. If you’re in the area, come meet SIPA admissions and find out more about an advanced career in public policy and international affairs.

4 ways to bring human rights into development work

Seventy years ago, the world laid out a common standard of fundamental rights for all people, which they said should be universally defended.

Now, the global environment is shifting. Nations that once led the way in promoting cross-border protections are retrenching. Scandals undercut major international development agencies when they fail to uphold these sentiments. Meanwhile, corporations — once vilified for their behavior — are building human rights into their work.

“Human rights touches every aspect of a company’s operations,” Margaret Jungk, managing director for human rights at Business for Social Responsibility, said in 2016. Today, corporations such as Facebook see “the responsibility [they] have to respect the individual and human rights of the … global community” — and hire accordingly, as stated in a recent job vacancy at the social media network.

Incorporating human rights into development work may require you to consider national politics, social media, sexual discrimination, and everything in between. To successfully navigate a new public, private, and nonprofit development landscape, four traits will be critical.

1. Context is key

Just as in broader questions of global development, human rights considerations are rarely clear-cut. Context matters. Are you trained to understand the economic, political, social, cultural, and historical factors at play? Can you identify the forces influencing a situation? Are you qualified to perform proper due diligence?

“Human rights work has to be focused within the contexts where development is playing out,” said Francisco Bencosme, Asia-Pacific advocacy manager at Amnesty International.

“In Myanmar, an entrenched system of apartheid can change the analysis of a seemingly positive housing project. [For example, under] the guise of development for Rakhine State, we have in the past seen new homes constructed for ethnic minorities on top old homes that used to belong to the Rohingya. It is these kind of development practices that need to take human rights contexts into account,” Bencosme said.

Seek out educational and professional opportunities that develop a flexible framework for evaluating decisions. One size will not fit all.

Mark Maloney, vice dean at the Sciences Po Paris School of International Affairs, explained: “Adaptability is a key skill … [one] even more important in humanitarian work because the stakes can be considerably higher when things go wrong.”

“For that reason, understanding the context, including relationships within and between parties, is a fundamental skill we try to develop through our Master in Human Rights and Humanitarian Action” he added. “This skill also maximizes the likelihood that our graduates will make the ‘right decision at the right moment’ when undertaking action on the ground.”

2. Be ‘client-ready’

Development professionals must tailor their work to many constituencies.

Have you practiced framing a discussion to make sense to diverse groups? Have you learned to persuade people while recognizing their different needs? Do you have the credentials to make people listen to what you have to say?

Learn to write and present arguments in clear, concise, and compelling ways. Work to improve your cross-cultural competencies. Expand proficiency in different languages. Look for opportunities to get close to the communities you want to serve, as well as to the funders, governments, and companies working on the ground.

“The human rights framework brings a human-centered analysis to the work of development professionals,” said Barbara Frey, director of the human rights program at the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

“This analysis starts with the question: Who is the rights bearer and who is the duty bearer in a situation? [It] tests how the consequences of actions can help or harm the clients [you] seek to serve.”

3. Develop connections

Access to individuals and information is critical to getting the job done.

With whom have you cultivated connections? From whom can you get critical information? Have you developed academic and professional networks to open doors?

Maintain relationships throughout your career via social media and in-person ties. Seek the counsel of former classmates, professors, or colleagues. Look for undergraduate or graduate schools with close ties to the field.

For example, students at the International Human Rights Center at Korea University’s Graduate School of International Studies incorporate concern for human rights into a wide range of activities. They build networks, workshops, and symposia in partnership with Human Asia, a human rights NGO in South Korea. According to the school, these opportunities prepare students to “serve as productive members of their organizations and to play leadership roles in the international community.”

4. Character is destiny

Easy answers do not always present themselves.

Are you bold enough to choose the difficult route? Can you withstand criticism from naysayers who cannot or will not envision anything beyond the status quo? Do you know how to rejuvenate your spirit when things look bleak?

“Forces larger than yourself will make you face some tough moral choices,” said Reuben Brigety, dean of George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. From his time at Human Rights Watch and the U.S. State Department, he has counseled young professionals to realize that “your character is your destiny. Have courage!”

To succeed at the intersection of human rights and development, you must ask good questions. Tailor your approach; build diverse networks; and, cultivate an internal moral compass to navigate the changing human rights and global development landscape.

Come meet our Admissions staff to get your application questions answered

Where will the Columbia admissions team be in the next few weeks? We’ll be traveling to you, available on campus, and connecting with you online.

We’re coming to you!

We’ve been traveling around graduate fairs speaking to prospective students (shoutout to the person in Seattle who recognized our names from this blog!) and would love to chat with you at an upcoming event.

The full calendar of off-campus recruiting events is available here, and below are a few highlights:

  • Oct. 22 – 25: Oregon and Washington
  • Oct. 29 – Nov. 1: Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana
  • November 6: APSIA Graduate School Fair – Madrid, Spain
  • November 7: APSIA Graduate School Fair – Paris, France
  • November 8: APSIA Graduate School Fair – London, UK

Virtual Info Sessions

While you may not be in an area that we are, we’d like you to know about it just in case you happen to be able to attend, or know of someone that would be interested. So for those of you who won’t be in the areas we’re traveling too, join the Executive Director of Admissions, Grace Han, and Director of Financial Aid, David Sheridan, for a Virtual Information Session focused on the 21-month full time Master of Public Administration and Master of International Affairs programs. You will have the opportunity to ask questions via online chat.

Are you coming to us in NYC?

  • Class visits are open for this semester. You can sit in on up to two classes and get a feel for the actual SIPA experience and community (and the beauty of NYC in the fall). If you’re unsure how to figure out the SIPA courses available, Julia provides a walkthrough here. You must register in advance for a class visit, so schedule it soon as spots can fill up quickly.
  • On-campus information sessions are available every month. Right now there are weekly info sessions for the MIA, MPA and MPA-DP programs. You’ll learn about Columbia University, SIPA, our curriculum and community, and get insider application tips from admissions staff. You’ll also be able to ask any questions you want about the application process. When their schedules allow, there’s also an optional tour of the International Affairs Building led by a current SIPA student, who can share their SIPA experience as well.

"The most global public policy school, where an international community of students and faculty address world challenges."

—Merit E. Janow, Dean, SIPA, Professor of Practice, International and Economic Law and International Affairs

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