Archive for SIPA – Page 2

SIPA celebrates 70th anniversary with forum, gala, more

Hundreds of alumni and students, faculty and friends gather for historic series of festivities

 SIPA marked its 70th anniversary with a historic celebration that drew guests from around the world to Morningside Heights. Hundreds of alumni and friends joined faculty, staff, and students for a long weekend filled with exciting programming. Among the many highlights were the SIPA Forum, the Global Leadership Awards Gala, and the David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum, as well as alumni-centered activities including receptions, presentations, cultural tours, and more.

The weekend began on March 30 with the 20th annual Dinkins Forum, keynoted by Congressman John Lewis, the civil-rights icon who has represented Georgia in the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years. Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger, SIPA Dean Merit E. Janow, and Professor David N. Dinkins, the former mayor, delivered welcoming remarks at the Forum. Following Representative Lewis’s keynote speech, a panel discussion featuring faculty and guests examined questions of economic and political citizenship.

The festivities continued the next day as SIPA’s Program in Economic Policy Management marked its 25th anniversary. The program included a series of panels featuring alumni, faculty, and leading experts in economic policy management; Chief Economist Maurice Obstfeld of the International Monetary Fund spoke at lunch. A networking reception for PEPM alums preceded a welcoming reception at Low Library for alumni of all programs.

On Saturday, attendees gathered for the SIPA Forum, an all-day event that brought together expert scholars and global policymakers for robust discussions about today’s pressing challenges. Janow moderated a keynote panel on global challenges of the 21st century. Taking part were Anthony Blinken, the former deputy secretary of state and national security adviser; Arvind Panagariya, vice chairman of the Indian planning agency NITI Aayog; Mari Pangestu, former trade minister of Indonesia; and Ambassador Zhang Qiyue, China’s consul general in New York.

Lunchtime sessions provided the chance for alumni to network or listen to presentations by current students on a variety of subjects, including student-led cyber initiatives, the experience of students of color at SIPA, and the evolution of the school’s capstone workshops. Graduates of the International Fellows Program also gathered for a special “SIPA Connections” lunch featuring guest speaker David Ottaway IF ’63, a renowned journalist, foreign correspondent, and Wilson Center Fellow.

On Saturday afternoon, distinguished experts and alumni took part in six different panel discussions—on climate change, economic development, foreign policy, social transformation, migration and refugees, and global economic stagnation.

[Photo by Kaitlyn Wells]

 

The day culminated in the Global Leadership Awards Gala at Morningside Heights’ own Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine. Almost 700 guests were on hand as SIPA honored Zbigniew Brzezinski, and Brazil’s Fundacao Lemann (Lemann Foundation) for their extraordinary contributions to the global public good. Brzezinski served as national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter and was the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at SIPA from 1960 to 1989. Fundacao Lemann is a Brazilian non-profit organization that focuses on improving education through innovation, management, and policy. As always, proceeds from the gala are used to fund student fellowships.

The Celebration Weekend concluded on April 2 with a choice of guided tours for alumni. Some opted for a walking tour of Historic Harlem while others visited the first Whitney Biennial since the Whitney Museum of American Art moved downtown. A whirlwind of activity spanning 70 hours had finally drawn to a close.

— Serina Bellamy MIA ’17 and Matt Terry MIA 17

The best cafes on campus

If you are visiting SIPA next week for ASD and want to take a coffee break or grab a bite to eat, you have many choices. SIPA students Amir Safa, MIA, 2017, and Roxanne Moin-Safa, MIA, 2017, share their favorites.

Nous Espresso Bar at the Graduate Student Center, Philosophy Building

Hours:
M-Th 8:30 am – 8 pm
F 8:30 am – 6 pm
Sa 10 am – 5 pm
Su 12-5 pm

Nous Espresso Bar awaits you inside the Graduate Student Center of Philosophy Hall, just a few steps across the bridge from SIPA. The sophisticated grad student will appreciate the modern art, high ceilings, and quality coffee found within these walls. Don’t be shy; it’s common to share tables in this popular space. Nous proudly serves responsibly sourced Stumptown Coffee and as well as monthly features from Parlor and Coava. The brewed coffee connoisseur can choose between drip, pour over, or cold brew. Watch the sushi master make magic while you wait in line and ponder over what else you can order: a made-to-order Donburi (Japanese rice bowl), a soup, a salad, or pastries? And if you are wondering, “Nous” refers to Greek philosophical term for the intellect.

Recommended: Organic tea by Rishi especially Coconut Oolong for a light afternoon zing and a decadent brownie

UP Coffee Co. in Pulitzer Hall, School of Journalism

Hours:
M-F 7 am – 8 pm
Sa & Su 9 am – 6pm

If you are into local organic coffees, sustainable snacking, and watching the news, then make a pitstop at the newly opened UP Coffee nestled in the corner of the School of Journalism. The upscale and modern vibe here offers an assortment of sandwiches, made-to-order hot paninis, salads in Mason jars, baked goods, and snacks to go. In addition to espresso, you have your choice of drip, pour over, cold brew, and nitrogen infused cold brew. You will always get natural light from the glass roof, and if the weather is pleasant, you will get to chomp down al-fresco style when the glass patio doors open. If you need your daily fix of news, watch the overhead news ticker or the tv screens broadcasting CNN.

Recommended: Organic coffee roasted locally in Brooklyn; hot Reuben panini.


Publique, School of International and Public Affairs

Hours:
M-Th 8:30 am – 7 pm
F 8:30 am – 5 pm
Sa & Su – Closed

Get a real taste of SIPA life at the newly opened Publique cafe on the 6th floor.  This large lounge space offers students a place to unwind between classes. Publique offers a variety of salads, sandwiches, coffee, tea, baked goods, and snacks for the student on the go.  

Recommended: Sandwich to go

Brownie’s Cafe in Avery Hall, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation

Hours:
M – Th 8 am – 6:30 pm
F 8 am – 5 pm

Is your coffee rendezvous a covert operation? We’ve got you covered. Step into Avery Hall next to the chapel, swing a left down the spiral staircase, through the architecture gallery room, and down another staircase into the tucked away secret of Brownie’s Cafe. This underground hideaway features modern, minimalist furniture with plenty of seating. Brownie’s Cafe features a wide selection of made-to-order and ready-made sandwiches, soups, Mediterranean side dishes, snack packs, baked goods, Toby’s Estate coffee, and Harney & Sons assorted teas.

Recommended: Grilled vegetable sandwich with Havarti cheese and Basil pesto on toasted focaccia bread.

 

Joe Coffee, NW Corner Science Building

Hours:
M – F 8 am – 8 pm
Sa & Su 9 am – 6 pm

Quite possibly the brightest cafe on campus, Joe Coffee is a coveted corner usually buzzing with professors, students, and locals. It’s located on the second floor of the NW Corner Science Building overlooking the gothic beauty of the Union Theological Seminary and the splendor of Teacher’s College. Enjoy the ambiance of ultra-modern, bright white furnishings and stunning marble flooring to boot. Light music spices things up here. Joe Coffee offers a variety of house-roasted coffees, espresso, and teas as well as lite fare including baked goods.

Recommended: Any of the house coffees, cappuccino.

[Photos by Amir Safa]

Social empowerment through pizza

In a video interview with Al Jazeera, pizzeria owner Alejandro Souza, MPA-DP 2013, shares how he’s “teaching people to fish” instead of giving handouts to Mexico City’s homeless population.

Watch the video on Al Jazeera’s website here.

[Photo courtesy of Al Jazeera]

I chose SIPA for its students

The school’s reputation and the world-class faculty weren’t the only reasons I chose to attend SIPA. In fact, one of the main reasons I decided on SIPA was for the student body: it’s made of top talent from around the world driven by one goal – to make a positive impact. How does SIPA ensure you get the most out of this environment while contributing to society? Through social entrepreneurial competitions like the SIPA Dean’s Public Policy Challenge Grant and Global Public Policy Network (GPPN) Conferences.

The Dean’s Public Policy Grant Program allows students to propose self-designed projects and ideas that use ICTs (information communication technologies) and/or data analytics to address policy challenges in the world. It grants funding to winning teams “to identify and support projects that have high potential to be implemented and produce a meaningful impact on the target problem in relatively near term”.[1] Competing teams are formed of students from across the schools (engineering, computer science, public policy, business etc.) of the university.

Past competition winners include:

In 2014, $25,000 was awarded to PaisaBack (Swami Ganesan and Jaivardhan Singh), a mobile application addressing public health issues in India by incentivizing health-care seeking behavior in women. “Women earn digital points for seeking preventative care such as immunizations and anemia screening for themselves and their children. They can then exchange these points at participating retailers for mobile talk time and other products and services. PaisaBack will generate revenue by monetizing this exclusive group of technology empowered women and the network of retailers who accept digital points. Maternal and infant mortality rates are 2-4 times higher in India than in other developing countries. 75% of Indian women are malnourished. PaisaBack will help break this status quo.[2]

Another $25,000 was awarded to Terranga (Tammy Lewin and Lindsay Litowitz), a “mobile app connecting travelers seeking unique experiences to locals offering insights into their lives. With Terranga, you can see the cities you visit through a local’s eyes: join a pickup soccer game, check out street food or go salsa dancing. But we’re much more than an app. Terranga believes in the power of tourism dollars. Instead of paying for a packaged tour, travelers have more meaningful experiences and can help fund locals’ dreams. [They] envision a world made better by travel and travel made more impactful by contributing to the lives of thousands of locals.” (Both teams are pictured above.)

In 2015, RemitMas (Maelis Carraro, Lina Henao, Daniela Hernandez, Felipe Pacheco, and Steven Pallickal ) team received $30,000, as first place winners, to support their project. “The team aims to build a cash-to-savings digital money transfer service that allows Latino immigrants in the United States to send money and deposit it into savings ‘wallets’ in their home countries; deposits can be designated for specific purposes like education or health care. Using a proposed tagline of ‘Send. Save. Support,’ the planned pilot program will focus on the 1 million Colombians living in the United States.”[3]

The second place team, Spokey (George Hampton, David Santos de Padua, and Gemma Peacocke), received $20,000. The Spokey team envisions an “online hub that will allow social, sporting, charitable, and community groups to list their vacant spaces that can be rented for special events to generate extra income. The team is developing an application with a two-way rating system—first in New York, with plans to expand to Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington by 2016.”[4]

[Photo courtesy of SIPA | Team I-Care pictured (from left): Kasumi Sugimoto, Fang Liu, Yue Wang, Xinwei Gao]

SIPA students also compete in the GPPN Conferences, where student teams from the GPPN member schools (London School of Economics and Political Science in Paris, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, the FGV-EAESP in São Paulo, Graduate School of Public Policy [GraSPP] at the University of Tokyo, and the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin) present ideas and approaches toward themed policy issues that vary each year. At this year’s conference in Paris, teams presented “solution-oriented ideas or prototypes” to address policy issues identified by the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).[5] A SIPA team, I-Care, won the competition this year for creating an online platform which connects senior citizens and their families to health care and social services through technology and medical data.

Even though I did not participate in these initiatives, I’ve had the privilege of collaborating with these brilliant minds on class projects and problems sets and call them friends at the end of the day. I’m a firm believer in the idea that success is very much affected by the people you surround yourself with; the growth-fostering environment at SIPA is designed to provide exactly this.

[Featured photo courtesy of SIPA | Pictured (L-R): PaisaBack and Terranga]
[1] SIPA website https://sipa.columbia.edu/challenge-grant
[2] https://sipa.columbia.edu/sipa-deans-public-policy-challenge-grant
[3] https://sipa.columbia.edu/news-center/article/remitmas-spokey-win-dean-s-public-policy-challenge-grants
[4] https://sipa.columbia.edu/news-center/article/remitmas-spokey-win-dean-s-public-policy-challenge-grants
[5] GPPN Website http://www.gppnetwork.org/conferences

 

2 things you should review prior to selecting your dream school

Congratulations, you’ve been accepted to SIPA! But you have too many offers, and it’s hard to decide. I know many of you are in these shoes so this post is meant to help you decide (and not sway you). To make an informed decision, key elements of the issue must be considered. Two of them will be discussed here: tuition and living costs and relevant employment opportunities.

For tuition and living costs, you’re right. SIPA is up there on the list when it comes to pricey graduate programs, and you pay for what you get. Aside from information you already know (Ivy League prestige with world-class faculty and a campus in one of the greatest cities in the world), you really need to ask yourself if you want to “cheap out” on an investment toward your life. But other programs awarded funding or more funding than SIPA? Consider that dilemma, and ask yourself how significant that number is. It’s one thing to get $10,000 over two years than, say, $80,000 in the same period. In other words, how much will it take for you to give up your dream school?

On that note, if you need some extra help strategizing how you’ll pay for graduate school, join us for the Financial Planning for Your Graduate Education Webinar on March 29 at 10:00 a.m. EST. You can RSVP here.

On relevant employment as a student, you’re probably thinking of paid/non-paid internships in a field where you’ll likely end up. This would be the disadvantage of choosing SIPA if DC is the target (although only to a slight degree). If you’re stuck on this point, you should take an honest look at what you want to get out of graduate school (in the near term). Is it building that academic/theoretical foundation and overloading on coursework, immersing yourself in student life and building meaningful relationships, and/or gaining valuable work experience? If you’re thinking all the above, you must hate sleeping. For some people, going back to school is meant to be a break from professional life. If building experience is a priority, you should consider how much the pay (if any), and exactly how substantive the work will be when going in part-time. Don’t forget about the mind capacity you’ll need for the time-consuming econ/quant problem sets waiting for you afterward.

And if you’re looking for additional insights into where SIPA students work, our Career Services tells you that and more here. For example, roughly one-third of 2016 graduates joined the public sector after graduation.

I had considerable work experience and clear goals coming into SIPA. Believe me, I love having money in my pocket, but going to my dream school mattered more. my biggest fear in life is living with regret. Besides, if I was going into debt regardless, I’d rather do it for something I most wanted. Developing an academic foundation and establishing a tight network were my goals for graduate school. In the end, the decision was easy.

Good luck and congratulations again!

[Photo courtesy of Garrett Coakley | (CC BY-NC 2.0)]

"The most global public policy school, where an international community of students and faculty address world challenges."

—Merit E. Janow, Dean, SIPA, Professor of Practice, International and Economic Law and International Affairs

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