Archive for Paying for SIPA

Reminder: Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship Applications are due Jan. 12, 2018

The Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship is accepting application for the 2018 Pickering Fellowship cohort at http://www.twc.edu/thomas-r-pickering-foreign-affairs-fellowship-program. Applications are due on January 12th, 2018.

The Pickering Fellowship is a U.S. Department of State and The Washington Center administered fellowship that provides students graduate students with financial support, mentoring, and professional development to prepare them for a career with the U.S. Department of State foreign service. Applicants who are women, members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, and those with financial need are encouraged to apply.

What the Program Has to Offer

  • Up to $37,500 annually for tuition, room, and board, books, mandatory fees, and some travel expenses for a two-year master’s degree in fields related to the Foreign Service such as business administration, economics, public policy, international affairs, and other relevant fields.
    • Up to $21,500 provided for each academic year for a Fellow’s tuition
    • Up to $16,000 stipend per academic year for room and board, books/laboratory fees, and travel between the Fellow’s residence and university location.
    • Two summer internships: one at a domestic office of the Department of State in Washington D.C. and one overseas at a U.S. embassy or consulate. The program provides stipends, transportation and housing for these internships.
  • Orientation to the Program and the Foreign Service at the Department of State.
  • Mentoring from a Foreign Service Officer throughout the duration of the fellowship.
  • Employment in the Department of State Foreign Service for those who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements in accordance with applicable law and State Department policy.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. citizenship
  • Applicants must be seeking admission to a U.S. graduate school beginning in fall 2018
  • Cumulative GPA of a 3.2 or higher on a 4.0 scale at the time of application
  • Applications must be able to attend June 2018 orientation in Washington, D.C. if selected.
  • Applicants must be available to fulfill the summer internship obligations (summer 2019 & summer 2020.

About the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State

The Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State is a career for those passionate about public service and representing the U.S. around the world. U.S. Foreign Service officers, also known as U.S. diplomats, work in over 270 embassies, consulates, and other diplomatic missions in every region of the world. Their mission to promote peace, support prosperity, and protect American citizens while advancing the interests of the U.S. abroad.

For more information on the Pickering Fellowship and the U.S. Department of State, visit http://www.twc.edu/thomas-r-pickering-foreign-affairs-fellowship-program.

SIPA Scholarships: Regional, International Opportunities

As we near our fellowship aid deadline on January 5th, here’s some information about regional, international scholarships. Among SIPA’s scholarships and fellowships are a number that are available to students from (or in some cases, studying) a particular country or region of the world.  Our scholarships are merit-based and competitive. The full list of gifts and endowed funds can be found here.

 The Jorge Paulo Lemann Fellowship: Available to Brazilian students, or those of other nationalities who can demonstrate a strong interest in social change in Brazil.

The Robert Legvold Fellowship Fund: Available to residents of, or immigrants from, the former Soviet Union, Albania, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, the former East Germany, Romania, Mongolia, Cuba or Vietnam.

The Kathryn Wasserman Davis Fellowship:  This award is available to students from the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the former Yugoslavia, China or Taiwan.

The Taha Fund:  This award is for students who are residents of Iraq or Turkey, or other international students who have expressed a serious interest in the Middle East as indicated by work experience, language training, course work, etc.

The Shetty and Ahmad Endowment: This fellowship is available to students who have resided in India or Pakistan and/or are interested in sustainable development.

The Magzhan Auezov Fellowship: The fellowship was established for residents of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, or to students studying topics related to that region of Central Asia.

The Columbia Scholarship Program for Displaced Persons: Full tuition and living expenses for students displaced as the result of the civil war in Syria.

The Rambourg Fellowship:  This new award provides full expenses for students from Tunisia.

We also encourage you to view our Financial Aid external funding sources for more information about scholarships from charitable or professional organizations, employers, philanthropic groups, or agencies in other countries. These resources have varying eligibility criteria, deadlines, and contact information. Our financial aid team is dedicated to helping you explore all available means to finance your graduate education. Make sure that you review our financial aid page for more details about financial planning and investing in your graduate education.

Payne International Development Fellowship Program is Now Welcoming Applications!

The Donald Payne International Development Fellowship Program is now accepting applications for the 2018 Donald Payne International Development Fellowship Program at https://www.paynefellows.org! The application deadline is January 19th, 2018.

The Donald Payne International Development Fellowship Program is now accepting applications for the 2018 Fellowship.

The Payne Fellowship is a U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Program, administered by Howard University, which seeks to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers as Foreign Service Officers in USAID. Candidates must be graduating seniors or college graduates with strong academic records and a desire to promote positive change in the world. The program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women and those with financial need.  Applicants with any undergraduate major are welcome to apply. Selected fellows will receive support for graduate school and will have a unique pathway to the USAID Foreign Service.

Program Benefits

  • An orientation to the Program and the Foreign Service at Howard University in Washington, D.C. in late spring 2018
  • Two summer internships, one on Capitol Hill in summer 2018 and one overseas at a USAID Mission in summer 2019.
  • Up to $22,000 annually toward tuition, fees and living expenses for a two-year master’s degree in fields related to the Foreign Service such as development, economics, public administration, public policy, business administration agriculture, environmental sciences, or urban planning at a U.S.-based institution.
  • Mentoring from a Foreign Service Officer throughout the duration of the fellowship.
  • Employment in USAID Foreign Service for those who successfully complete the program and meet Foreign Service entry requirements, in accordance with applicable law and USAID policy, with each Payne Fellow committing to a minimum of three years of service.

Eligibility requirements

  • U.S. citizenship
  • Seeking admission to graduate school in fall 2018 for a two-year program in an area of relevance to the Foreign Service at a U.S.-based institution
  • Cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or higher on a 4.0 scale at the time of application

About USAID Foreign Service

USAID Foreign Service Officers work on the front lines of some of the most pressing global challenges of our times, including poverty, hunger, injustice, disease, environmental degradation, climate change, conflict and violent extremism. They are part of a corps of officers who have worked for more than fifty years to make lasting improvements to the lives of millions of people around the globe. USAID Foreign Service Officers are stationed in Washington and in more than 75 countries in five regions worldwide – Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe and Eurasia, Asia, and the Middle East. They work alongside colleagues from other U.S. government agencies to achieve our country’s foreign policy objectives in democracy and governance, economic growth and trade, peace and security, education and health, conflict mitigation and humanitarian response.

Program Contact: paynefellows@howard.edu, 202-806-5952

Common SIPA stresses and their cures

From 2016:

When we talk about graduate school, especially at elite institutions, we inevitably talk about stress. But Seeples are unique, and so are their sources of stress. Read-on for some of the most common ones, and their cures:

  1. Not having enough money: Refer to my “Managing A Student Budget” post back in February 2016. You may feel poor now, but you won’t for long, and there are ways to deal with the costs of a SIPA education and life in New York. Take advantage of cost-managing resources (campus and off-campus), try finding additional sources of income, and manage your expectations.
  2. Being homesick: See my post on conquering homesickness. From immersing yourself in work, to making new friends and exploring New York, to connecting with your roots and taking trips home when you can, there are countless ways to mitigate the painful effects of being away from home.
  3. Feeling overwhelmed: Take it easy, or rather, take it one activity/task/day at a time. SIPA can be a lot to swallow, between the academic, the professional and the social, but you wouldn’t have gotten in if we hadn’t believed you could do it, and thrive! There are campus resources available for help, from academic support in OSA, to counseling at Columbia Health. Reach out if you feel like you’re drowning, there’s always a solution!
  4. Having your order messed up at (insert café): Be it Alice’s, Artopolis, Nous, etc., we have all had our share of “I asked for a pistachio muffin and a hot latte, not a cold pistachio latte and a coffee-flavored muffin!” moments. It can be particularly stressful when you’re rushing to class, or have a long line of people behind you. Be nice (try! I don’t always succeed, especially in the face of repeated “offenses”), explain your order again, and be patient while the staff gets it together. Or, if you’re truly at wits’ end (like me), ask for your money back and leave empty-handed. Sometimes it’s a relief to just step away.
  5. Administration Woes: Sometimes it’s the student worker in OSA who doesn’t know the answer to your question, or a mistype in an official document you had requested. Mistakes happen, it’s life, and nobody (not even Ivy League schools) is perfect! So take a deep breath, and go through the same steps as for # 4 above. Since leaving empty-handed is less realistic than for # 4, try your best to work with the administration to resolve your issue. Help them help you! Not only will they be grateful for your professionalism, patience and resourcefulness, you will also likely get the problem solved faster!
  6. Professor Woes: The professor didn’t clarify an assignment, or didn’t provide resources to find course readings, or instituted a policy you disagree with/which has the potential to harm your academic performance (such as the dreaded “no laptops” policy). Dialogue is your best friend! Talk to the professor, in person, if possible. Explain your needs, and your position (sometimes professors can be unaware of these), and ask if they can either 1. Change the policy or 2. Make an exception. For e.g., someone in my classes had a documented disability, but, due to miscommunication from the appropriate office, the professor never found out about it, and banned laptop use in class. After the student explained that he was unable to take notes by hand, the professor made an exception in their case. Likewise, when I told one of my professors a book on the syllabus was not available in the library (and was quite expensive to buy), she lent me her copy, and later put it on Reserves in the library for the course. Speaking out can sometimes help your peers, and generations of students who come after you.
  7. Having to buy things you can get for free: This applies to many items, from your graduation caps and gowns (my undergraduate loaned them to us for free, for the graduation ceremony, and at SIPA, I am borrowing them from a SIPA alumna who bought them), to books (professors may recommend that you buy them, but you are in no way obligated to! You can also borrow them, read them at the library, or find them online, if they are available), to materials (such as the guide for Professional Development course – it is really just an introductory guide on how to write resumes, cover letters and the likes, and you can either find that information online, or borrow the guide from a second-year SIPA student. You are required to bring it to one session of the class, but it is barely used).
  8. Housing Woes: You have rats. You roommate plays the saxophone at 3 AM. There is no hot water. The elevator is broken. Talk to Columbia Housing, and seek other resources within Columbia and SIPA. Even if resources are not immediately available, people may have information that can help you. Another SIPA friend of mine had to move out from her apartment in a matter of weeks because her landlady was apparently renting out the apartment illegally. She was casually talking to one of the Deans about it, and they happened to know someone who was looking to sublet their apartment for the year, so she moved into a new building that same week. SIPA/Columbia are a vast network, and this network can offer a multitude of solutions if you reach out.
  9. Stressing about unnecessary things: If # 4 is a genuine source of stress, and you nodded in agreement, instead of just rolling your eyes and scrolling down, then, in Ron Weasley’s words, you need to reassess your priorities! :))
[Image by Kaitlyn Wells | Yes, that’s a SIPA stress ball!]

2018 Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program applications are live

The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program is now accepting applications for the 2018 Rangel International Affairs Graduate Fellowship Program at www.rangelprogram.org. The Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a U.S. Department of State program, administered by Howard University that seeks to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers as Foreign Service Officers in the U.S. Department of State. Candidates must be graduating seniors or college graduates with strong academic records and a desire to promote positive change in the world. The program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women and those with financial need. Applicants with any undergraduate major are welcome to apply. Selected fellows will receive support for graduate school and will enter into exciting and rewarding careers representing the United States overseas.

Program Benefits

  • An orientation to the Program and the Foreign Service at Howard University in Washington, D.C. in late spring 2018
  • Two summer internships, one on Capitol Hill in summer 2018 and one overseas at a U.S. embassy or consulate in summer 2019.
  • Up to $37,500 annually toward tuition, fees and living expenses for a two-year master’s degree in fields related to the Foreign Service such as Business Administration, Economics, Public Policy, and International Relations at a U.S.-based institution.
  • Mentoring from a Foreign Service Officer throughout the duration of the fellowship.
  • Employment in the State Department Foreign Service for those who successfully complete the program and meet Foreign Service entry requirements, in accordance with applicable law and State Department policy, with each Rangel Fellow committing to a minimum of five years of service.

Eligibility requirements

  • U.S. citizenship
  • Seeking admission to graduate school in fall 2018 for a two-year program in an area of relevance to the Foreign Service at a U.S.-based institution
  • Cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or higher on a 4.0 scale at the time of application

About the U.S. Foreign Service
Foreign Service Officers in the U.S. Department of State are responsible for formulating, implementing and supporting U.S. foreign policy. Their work includes analyzing political and economic events around the world; negotiating with foreign governments; assisting U.S. citizens abroad; educating foreign audiences about American culture and values; and managing an embassy’s operations. They are engaged in foreign policy issues such as conflict resolution, human rights, environmental and health issues, nuclear nonproliferation, and educational exchange. A Foreign Service career is much more than just a job; it is a uniquely demanding and rewarding way of life. Foreign Service Officers work in Washington and in more than 250 diplomatic posts worldwide. As representatives of the United States, Foreign Service Officers have a direct impact on people’s lives, witness history in the making, and help create and implement U.S. policy.

Application Deadline
September 21, 2017

Program Contact
rangelprogram@howard.edu
202-806-4367 or 877-633-0002

 

Learn more at www.rangelprogram.org.

"The most global public policy school, where an international community of students and faculty address world challenges."

—Merit E. Janow, Dean, SIPA, Professor of Practice, International and Economic Law and International Affairs

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