Archive for Columbia University

Columbia University unveils new campus sustainability plan

Just in time for Earth Day last week, Columbia University pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 35 percent in the next three years through a mix of energy conservation and efficiency measures under its first campus sustainability plan.

The three-year plan, released a day before Earth Day, represents a practical fulfillment of the sustainability principles that university President Lee C. Bollinger announced at the beginning of the academic year. It sets clear targets for shrinking Columbia’s carbon footprint and reducing waste by improving efficiencies in campus operations, boosting composting, recycling and public transit-use, and investing in energy-saving technology.

“At Columbia, we have long understood the profound threat climate change poses to the future of our planet and the role our community should play in confronting it,” Bollinger said. “Through our actions, policies, and behavior, we provide a model for the kind of global response we seek. Most significant in this effort is the basic research conducted by Columbia’s faculty and actively engaged student body working in schools and departments across the University.”

More than a year in the making, the plan was produced with extensive input from students, administrators and faculty scientists—many of them world leaders in the sustainability field. The plan’s overarching goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by zeroing in on energy use and conservation, transportation and waste management.

“Columbia has led pioneering research on the environment, and how our actions will affect future generations,” said Executive Vice President for University Facilities and Operations David Greenberg. “With this plan, Columbia is taking concrete steps to limit our own contribution to climate change. Setting measurable goals and actionable strategies will allow us to track our progress.”

Read more about Columbia’s sustainability goals and stakeholder involvement here.

Speak up for what’s right, says Congressman John Lewis

Civil rights icon keynotes 20th annual Dinkins Forum

SIPA’s 70th Anniversary festivities kicked off on March 30 as a selection of boldface names from New York City’s political world joined students, faculty, and alumni at Miller Theatre for this year’s David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum. Headlining the event was keynote speaker John Lewis, the civil rights icon and U.S. congressman whose home district is centered on Atlanta, Georgia.

The annual forum, which marked its 20th year, is named for the SIPA professor who served as New York City’s first African-American mayor. The event continues to provide a platform for analysis and dialogue that addresses many of the challenging issues facing urban policies, programs, and initiatives.

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger opened the evening, saluting Lewis’s experiences in the civil rights movement and his lifelong support for equal rights. Without such a “lived sense of where we have been,” Bollinger said, “we cannot really understand where we are and where we must go.”

Dean Merit E. Janow of SIPA introduced the forum’s namesake, David Dinkins, who spoke briefly about the history of the forum and past speakers such as Charles Rangel, Al Gore, and Hillary Clinton.

In welcoming Lewis, Dinkins noted that he had “stood on [Lewis’s] broad, strong shoulders for the last 50 years, along with Americans of all races, ages, and creeds.

“And so have you,” he added, addressing the gathered audience.

Relating some of the congressman’s life experience, Dinkins described how Lewis—a son of Alabama sharecroppers—was active in protesting for freedom, as he participated in sit-ins, bus rides, and marches. Most significant was the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery known as Bloody Sunday, in which Lewis suffered a fractured skull at the hands of police troopers. Lewis would go on to be arrested 40 times between then and today.

Taking the stage, Lewis spoke about how he was told as a child that segregation of the time was just “the way it is” and not to get in the way. However, with encouragement from a schoolteacher, Lewis read everything he could, he said—about Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr., and others.

He was inspired, he said, to “find a way to get in the way, to get in good trouble, necessary trouble. And I’ve been getting in trouble ever since.”

Using the cadences of a preacher and alternating between quiet and booming tones, Lewis said his philosophy is that “when you see something that is not right, not fair, not just, you have a moral obligation—a mission and a mandate—to speak up, to speak out, and get in the way.”

Lewis recounted his memory of the march in Selma, where he thought he was going to die. But he was taken in, he said, by sisters at a nearby Catholic hospital, who took care of him. Recently, he reconnected with three of those sisters, who recognized him, and they hugged.

“We must never, ever forget the bridges that brought us across,” he said.

“Sometimes you’re called to turn things upside down, to set it right side up,” Lewis said as he concluded his remarks. “Teach the students, teach the young, because the young will teach us. And they will lead us to a better place [where] no one is left out or left behind.”

The forum also featured a panel discussion on “Reframing Economic and Political Citizenship,” moderated by Ester Fuchs, director of SIPA’s concentration in Urban and Social Policy. Participants included faculty member Michael A. Nutter and guests David Goodman, Verna Eggleston, and Michael Waldman. The panelists discussed at length the transformations U.S. citizens are experiencing to their civil, economic, and political identities under the Trump administration, and what we need to be doing to preserve the hard-fought victories of the past and expand our vision of rights for the future.

— Matt Terry MIA ’17

Watch complete event

 

SIPA celebrates 70th anniversary with forum, gala, more

Hundreds of alumni and students, faculty and friends gather for historic series of festivities

 SIPA marked its 70th anniversary with a historic celebration that drew guests from around the world to Morningside Heights. Hundreds of alumni and friends joined faculty, staff, and students for a long weekend filled with exciting programming. Among the many highlights were the SIPA Forum, the Global Leadership Awards Gala, and the David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum, as well as alumni-centered activities including receptions, presentations, cultural tours, and more.

The weekend began on March 30 with the 20th annual Dinkins Forum, keynoted by Congressman John Lewis, the civil-rights icon who has represented Georgia in the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years. Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger, SIPA Dean Merit E. Janow, and Professor David N. Dinkins, the former mayor, delivered welcoming remarks at the Forum. Following Representative Lewis’s keynote speech, a panel discussion featuring faculty and guests examined questions of economic and political citizenship.

The festivities continued the next day as SIPA’s Program in Economic Policy Management marked its 25th anniversary. The program included a series of panels featuring alumni, faculty, and leading experts in economic policy management; Chief Economist Maurice Obstfeld of the International Monetary Fund spoke at lunch. A networking reception for PEPM alums preceded a welcoming reception at Low Library for alumni of all programs.

On Saturday, attendees gathered for the SIPA Forum, an all-day event that brought together expert scholars and global policymakers for robust discussions about today’s pressing challenges. Janow moderated a keynote panel on global challenges of the 21st century. Taking part were Anthony Blinken, the former deputy secretary of state and national security adviser; Arvind Panagariya, vice chairman of the Indian planning agency NITI Aayog; Mari Pangestu, former trade minister of Indonesia; and Ambassador Zhang Qiyue, China’s consul general in New York.

Lunchtime sessions provided the chance for alumni to network or listen to presentations by current students on a variety of subjects, including student-led cyber initiatives, the experience of students of color at SIPA, and the evolution of the school’s capstone workshops. Graduates of the International Fellows Program also gathered for a special “SIPA Connections” lunch featuring guest speaker David Ottaway IF ’63, a renowned journalist, foreign correspondent, and Wilson Center Fellow.

On Saturday afternoon, distinguished experts and alumni took part in six different panel discussions—on climate change, economic development, foreign policy, social transformation, migration and refugees, and global economic stagnation.

[Photo by Kaitlyn Wells]

 

The day culminated in the Global Leadership Awards Gala at Morningside Heights’ own Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine. Almost 700 guests were on hand as SIPA honored Zbigniew Brzezinski, and Brazil’s Fundacao Lemann (Lemann Foundation) for their extraordinary contributions to the global public good. Brzezinski served as national security adviser to President Jimmy Carter and was the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at SIPA from 1960 to 1989. Fundacao Lemann is a Brazilian non-profit organization that focuses on improving education through innovation, management, and policy. As always, proceeds from the gala are used to fund student fellowships.

The Celebration Weekend concluded on April 2 with a choice of guided tours for alumni. Some opted for a walking tour of Historic Harlem while others visited the first Whitney Biennial since the Whitney Museum of American Art moved downtown. A whirlwind of activity spanning 70 hours had finally drawn to a close.

— Serina Bellamy MIA ’17 and Matt Terry MIA 17

The best cafes on campus

If you are visiting SIPA next week for ASD and want to take a coffee break or grab a bite to eat, you have many choices. SIPA students Amir Safa, MIA, 2017, and Roxanne Moin-Safa, MIA, 2017, share their favorites.

Nous Espresso Bar at the Graduate Student Center, Philosophy Building

Hours:
M-Th 8:30 am – 8 pm
F 8:30 am – 6 pm
Sa 10 am – 5 pm
Su 12-5 pm

Nous Espresso Bar awaits you inside the Graduate Student Center of Philosophy Hall, just a few steps across the bridge from SIPA. The sophisticated grad student will appreciate the modern art, high ceilings, and quality coffee found within these walls. Don’t be shy; it’s common to share tables in this popular space. Nous proudly serves responsibly sourced Stumptown Coffee and as well as monthly features from Parlor and Coava. The brewed coffee connoisseur can choose between drip, pour over, or cold brew. Watch the sushi master make magic while you wait in line and ponder over what else you can order: a made-to-order Donburi (Japanese rice bowl), a soup, a salad, or pastries? And if you are wondering, “Nous” refers to Greek philosophical term for the intellect.

Recommended: Organic tea by Rishi especially Coconut Oolong for a light afternoon zing and a decadent brownie

UP Coffee Co. in Pulitzer Hall, School of Journalism

Hours:
M-F 7 am – 8 pm
Sa & Su 9 am – 6pm

If you are into local organic coffees, sustainable snacking, and watching the news, then make a pitstop at the newly opened UP Coffee nestled in the corner of the School of Journalism. The upscale and modern vibe here offers an assortment of sandwiches, made-to-order hot paninis, salads in Mason jars, baked goods, and snacks to go. In addition to espresso, you have your choice of drip, pour over, cold brew, and nitrogen infused cold brew. You will always get natural light from the glass roof, and if the weather is pleasant, you will get to chomp down al-fresco style when the glass patio doors open. If you need your daily fix of news, watch the overhead news ticker or the tv screens broadcasting CNN.

Recommended: Organic coffee roasted locally in Brooklyn; hot Reuben panini.


Publique, School of International and Public Affairs

Hours:
M-Th 8:30 am – 7 pm
F 8:30 am – 5 pm
Sa & Su – Closed

Get a real taste of SIPA life at the newly opened Publique cafe on the 6th floor.  This large lounge space offers students a place to unwind between classes. Publique offers a variety of salads, sandwiches, coffee, tea, baked goods, and snacks for the student on the go.  

Recommended: Sandwich to go

Brownie’s Cafe in Avery Hall, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation

Hours:
M – Th 8 am – 6:30 pm
F 8 am – 5 pm

Is your coffee rendezvous a covert operation? We’ve got you covered. Step into Avery Hall next to the chapel, swing a left down the spiral staircase, through the architecture gallery room, and down another staircase into the tucked away secret of Brownie’s Cafe. This underground hideaway features modern, minimalist furniture with plenty of seating. Brownie’s Cafe features a wide selection of made-to-order and ready-made sandwiches, soups, Mediterranean side dishes, snack packs, baked goods, Toby’s Estate coffee, and Harney & Sons assorted teas.

Recommended: Grilled vegetable sandwich with Havarti cheese and Basil pesto on toasted focaccia bread.

 

Joe Coffee, NW Corner Science Building

Hours:
M – F 8 am – 8 pm
Sa & Su 9 am – 6 pm

Quite possibly the brightest cafe on campus, Joe Coffee is a coveted corner usually buzzing with professors, students, and locals. It’s located on the second floor of the NW Corner Science Building overlooking the gothic beauty of the Union Theological Seminary and the splendor of Teacher’s College. Enjoy the ambiance of ultra-modern, bright white furnishings and stunning marble flooring to boot. Light music spices things up here. Joe Coffee offers a variety of house-roasted coffees, espresso, and teas as well as lite fare including baked goods.

Recommended: Any of the house coffees, cappuccino.

[Photos by Amir Safa]

Virtually walk on Columbia University’s campus today

If you’re like me, you enjoy staying toasty warm in frigid temperatures. But that in itself presents a problem when you want to venture outside to see the sights; especially if you’re planning to visit NYC anytime soon. To solve the dilemma of warmth vs. curiosity here’s a slideshow of some of the hotspots you would see on Columbia University’s campus during a visit. While it doesn’t make up for seeing the grand buildings in person, at least you’ll still get a sense of the beautiful architecture and landscapes.

So save your campus visit for warmer weather and enjoy this virtual tour in the interim. Happy touring!

Celebrated as an example of purely classical architecture, Low Memorial Library was completed in 1897 and served as the main library until 1934. Today this landmark building functions as the administrative center of the University and houses the offices of the President and the Provost. One of the most impressive features of Low is its rotunda topped by the largest all-granite dome in the country. The rotunda, originally the Library's main reading room, is now used for exhibitions and major University events. Low also serves as the headquarters of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, which offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in more than 26 disciplines and in 28 interdepartmental and interschool programs.

Celebrated as an example of purely classical architecture, Low Memorial Library was completed in 1897 and served as the main library until 1934. Today this landmark building functions as the administrative center of the University and houses the offices of the President and the Provost. One of the most impressive features of Low is its rotunda topped by the largest all-granite dome in the country. The rotunda, originally the Library’s main reading room, is now used for exhibitions and major University events.

 

Low also serves as the headquarters of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, which offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in more than 26 disciplines and in 28 interdepartmental and interschool programs.

 

Low Plaza has been described as one of the great urban spaces in America. It was built to resemble a Greek amphitheater and is ideal for outdoor events, including concerts, theatrical performances and fairs. Students flock to the plaza steps to sunbathe, socialize and study, making it, in the words of a leading architect, a true “urban beach.” Watching over the plaza is Alma Mater, a bronze sculpture by Daniel Chester French, famous for his statue of Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

 

The cathedral window of Kent Hall depicting Justice with her scales and sword dates back to the days when the building housed the Law School. Named after Columbia's first law professor, James Kent, the building now features the C.V. Starr East Asian Library, and the departments of Middle East and East Asian Languages and Cultures. The Starr Library has one of the major collections on East Asia in the United States and includes books, periodicals, and microfilms of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tibetan and Western language materials. Kent is also the administrative home of Student Financial Services and the Registrar. Students can obtain university I.D. cards here.

 

The cathedral window of Kent Hall depicting Justice with her scales and sword dates back to the days when the building housed the Law School. Named after Columbia’s first law professor, James Kent, the building now features the C.V. Starr East Asian Library, and the departments of Middle East and East Asian Languages and Cultures. The Starr Library has one of the major collections on East Asia in the United States and includes books, periodicals, and microfilms of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tibetan and Western language materials. Kent is also the administrative home of Student Financial Services and the Registrar. Students can obtain university I.D. cards here.

 

An authentic bronze casting of Rodin's Le Penseur (The Thinker) stands before the entrance of Philosophy Hall. The building is home to several departments, including Philosophy, English and Comparative Literature, French, and Romance Philology.

 

An authentic bronze casting of Rodin’s Le Penseur (The Thinker) stands before the entrance of Philosophy Hall. The building is home to several departments, including Philosophy, English and Comparative Literature, French, and Romance Philology.

 

Buell Hall is home to La Maison Française. Founded in 1913, La Maison Française is the oldest French cultural center established on an American university campus. It is a meeting place for students, scholars, business leaders, policy-makers and those seeking a better understanding of the French and Francophone world. Buell Hall also houses the Temple Hoyne Center for the Study of American Architecture, the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery and Columbia's Headquarters for Japanese Architectural Studies and Advanced Research.

 

Buell Hall is home to La Maison Française. Founded in 1913, La Maison Française is the oldest French cultural center established on an American university campus. It is a meeting place for students, scholars, business leaders, policy-makers and those seeking a better understanding of the French and Francophone world.
Buell Hall also houses the Temple Hoyne Center for the Study of American Architecture, the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery and Columbia’s Headquarters for Japanese Architectural Studies and Advanced Research.

 

Built in 1904 and designated a New York City landmark in 1966, St. Paul's Chapel is nondenominational and provides a beautiful space for hundreds of events each year, including weekly religious services, weddings, lectures, memorials and concerts. Artwork inside the Chapel includes three stained glass windows handcrafted by John LaFarge and a Peace Altar designed by George Nakashima.

 

Built in 1904 and designated a New York City landmark in 1966, St. Paul’s Chapel is nondenominational and provides a beautiful space for hundreds of events each year, including weekly religious services, weddings, lectures, memorials and concerts. Artwork inside the Chapel includes three stained glass windows handcrafted by John LaFarge and a Peace Altar designed by George Nakashima.

 

Avery Hall houses Columbia's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, which was founded in 1881. Masters degrees are offered in architecture and in specialties such as urban design, urban planning, historic preservation, and real estate development. The School also offers a post-professional program, the degree in Advanced Architectural Design. Doctoral programs are offered in conjunction with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, one of the most comprehensive architectural libraries in the country, is located here. Its collection includes books and periodicals in architecture, historic preservation, art history, painting, sculpture, graphic arts, decorative arts, city planning, real estate, and archaeology. The Avery collection in architecture ranges from the first Western printed book on architecture, L. B. Alberti's De Re Aedificatoria (1485), to a broad collection of books on contemporary architectural movements.

 

Avery Hall houses Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, which was founded in 1881. Masters degrees are offered in architecture and in specialties such as urban design, urban planning, historic preservation, and real estate development. The School also offers a post-professional program, the degree in Advanced Architectural Design. Doctoral programs are offered in conjunction with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.
The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, one of the most comprehensive architectural libraries in the country, is located here. Its collection includes books and periodicals in architecture, historic preservation, art history, painting, sculpture, graphic arts, decorative arts, city planning, real estate, and archaeology. The Avery collection in architecture ranges from the first Western printed book on architecture, L. B. Alberti’s De Re Aedificatoria (1485), to a broad collection of books on contemporary architectural movements.

 

Fayerweather is one of the buildings that complete a small quadrangle on the northeast end of the campus. It is home to the History and Sociology departments. Along with traditional areas of study, the history department offers joint programs with the law school, the School of International and Public affairs, as well as the medical school and the School of Public Health. Sociology also maintains active teaching and research ties with various schools, departments and institutes at Columbia.

 

Fayerweather is one of the buildings that complete a small quadrangle on the northeast end of the campus. It is home to the History and Sociology departments.
Along with traditional areas of study, the history department offers joint programs with the law school, the School of International and Public affairs, as well as the medical school and the School of Public Health. Sociology also maintains active teaching and research ties with various schools, departments and institutes at Columbia.

 

Jerome Greene Hall Jerome Greene Hall, the main building within the Law School complex, has been home to the School of Law since 1960. The School, which was founded in 1858, is one of the oldest in the United States. Its graduates include U. S. presidents, Supreme Court justices; senators; governors and other high ranking government officials; leading human rights advocates; legal scholars; entrepreneurs, and other corporate leaders. It is home to many of America's most distinguished legal academics, and the site of one of the finest law libraries in the world. Max Abramovitz and Wallace Harrison designed the building. Among his many buildings, Harrison is perhaps most widely known for leading an international team of architects that designed the United Nations headquarters.

 

Jerome Greene Hall, the main building within the Law School complex, has been home to the School of Law since 1960. The School, which was founded in 1858, is one of the oldest in the United States. Its graduates include U. S. presidents, Supreme Court justices; senators; governors and other high ranking government officials; leading human rights advocates; legal scholars; entrepreneurs, and other corporate leaders. It is home to many of America’s most distinguished legal academics, and the site of one of the finest law libraries in the world.
Max Abramovitz and Wallace Harrison designed the building. Among his many buildings, Harrison is perhaps most widely known for leading an international team of architects that designed the United Nations headquarters.

 

Casa Italiana, one of three New York City landmarks on campus, is home to the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America. It is one of many buildings on campus designed by the renowned architectural firm of McKim, Meade and White. It was restored in 1993 based on the designs of Italian architect Italo Rota of Paris and Milan and Samuel E. White of Buttrick, White & Burtis of New York. Founded in 1991 on the basis of an agreement between the Republic of Italy and Columbia University, the Academy promotes advanced research in all areas relating to Italian history and society. In addition, it seeks to establish a high level of academic and cultural exchange between Italy and the US.

 

Casa Italiana, one of three New York City landmarks on campus, is home to the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America. It is one of many buildings on campus designed by the renowned architectural firm of McKim, Meade and White. It was restored in 1993 based on the designs of Italian architect Italo Rota of Paris and Milan and Samuel E. White of Buttrick, White & Burtis of New York.
Founded in 1991 on the basis of an agreement between the Republic of Italy and Columbia University, the Academy promotes advanced research in all areas relating to Italian history and society. In addition, it seeks to establish a high level of academic and cultural exchange between Italy and the US.

 

The International Affairs Building houses Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). Founded in 1946, SIPA offers interdisciplinary masters degree programs in international affairs, and in public policy and administration. Several certificate programs are also offered. The building houses seven regional institutes, including the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, the Harriman Institute for the study of Russia and the former Soviet republics, as well as centers devoted to the study of Human Rights, the United Nations, and Urban Research and Policy. The Economics and Political Science departments, and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy are also located here, as is the Lehman Library for the Social Sciences.

 

The International Affairs Building houses Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). Founded in 1946, SIPA offers interdisciplinary masters degree programs in international affairs, and in public policy and administration. Several certificate programs are also offered. The building houses seven regional institutes, including the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, the Harriman Institute for the study of Russia and the former Soviet republics, as well as centers devoted to the study of Human Rights, the United Nations, and Urban Research and Policy. The Economics and Political Science departments, and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy are also located here, as is the Lehman Library for the Social Sciences.

 

Construction on Schermerhorn began in 1896. An inscription above the entrance reads "For the advancement of natural science. Speak to the earth and it shall teach thee." The centers and departments located in this building include: African-American Studies; Anthropology; Art History and Archaeology; Geology; Psychology; Women's Studies; the Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Fine Arts Center, and the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation. Franz Boas founded the nation's first department of anthropology here in 1899. Graduates from this program include pioneering cultural anthropologists Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead. Schermerhorn is well known in science circles as the site of Thomas Hunt Morgan's drosophila experiment, which laid the foundation for modern genetics and helped him earn the Nobel Prize in 1933.

 

Construction on Schermerhorn began in 1896. An inscription above the entrance reads “For the advancement of natural science. Speak to the earth and it shall teach thee.” The centers and departments located in this building include: African-American Studies; Anthropology; Art History and Archaeology; Geology; Psychology; Women’s Studies; the Miriam & Ira D. Wallach Fine Arts Center, and the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.
Franz Boas founded the nation’s first department of anthropology here in 1899. Graduates from this program include pioneering cultural anthropologists Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead.
Schermerhorn is well known in science circles as the site of Thomas Hunt Morgan’s drosophila experiment, which laid the foundation for modern genetics and helped him earn the Nobel Prize in 1933.

 

Uris Hall serves as the main building for Columbia Business School, which offers MBA, Executive MBA and PhD programs, as well as short-term, non-degree courses for executives. The school’s location in the business and financial capital of the world and its relationships with global business and academic leaders make it one of the premier schools for graduate business education. The school also shares a new building on Amsterdam Avenue with the School of Law.

 

Uris Hall serves as the main building for Columbia Business School, which offers MBA, Executive MBA and PhD programs, as well as short-term, non-degree courses for executives. The school’s location in the business and financial capital of the world and its relationships with global business and academic leaders make it one of the premier schools for graduate business education. The school also shares a new building on Amsterdam Avenue with the School of Law.

 

The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science occupies a cluster of buildings on the north end of the campus: the Schapiro Center for Engineering and Physical Science Research (pictured), shared with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; the Seeley Wintersmith Mudd building, which is home to the Botwinick Gateway Laboratories, a state-of-the-art facility for computer-aided design; the Computer Science Building, and Engineering Terrace. The School offers bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in applied physics and applied mathematics; biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering and engineering mechanics; computer science; earth and environmental engineering; electrical engineering; industrial engineering and operations research, and mechanical engineering.

 

The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science occupies a cluster of buildings on the north end of the campus: the Schapiro Center for Engineering and Physical Science Research (pictured), shared with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; the Seeley Wintersmith Mudd building, which is home to the Botwinick Gateway Laboratories, a state-of-the-art facility for computer-aided design; the Computer Science Building, and Engineering Terrace.
The School offers bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in applied physics and applied mathematics; biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering and engineering mechanics; computer science; earth and environmental engineering; electrical engineering; industrial engineering and operations research, and mechanical engineering.

 

Pupin Hall is home to the Physics and Astronomy departments. The building is named after Michael I. Pupin, a graduate of Columbia College, and a professor at the University for more than 30 years. Pupin was an active inventor and patented many of his ground-breaking inventions including a method of rapid X-ray photography, secondary X-ray radiation, telecommunications technology, and sonar-related technology. During his lifetime, he received 34 patents. His autobiography, From Immigrant to Inventor, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1924.

 

Pupin Hall is home to the Physics and Astronomy departments. The building is named after Michael I. Pupin, a graduate of Columbia College, and a professor at the University for more than 30 years. Pupin was an active inventor and patented many of his ground-breaking inventions including a method of rapid X-ray photography, secondary X-ray radiation, telecommunications technology, and sonar-related technology. During his lifetime, he received 34 patents. His autobiography, From Immigrant to Inventor, won a Pulitzer Prize in 1924.

 

Havemeyer Hall is devoted to the application and study of Chemistry, with a strong emphasis on research. Pioneering research conducted here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored in 1932. Room 309, the grand lecture hall in the center of Havemeyer remains the signature architectural feature of Charles Follen McKim's original design. It has been prominently featured in over a dozen films.

 

Havemeyer Hall is devoted to the application and study of Chemistry, with a strong emphasis on research. Pioneering research conducted here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored in 1932. Room 309, the grand lecture hall in the center of Havemeyer remains the signature architectural feature of Charles Follen McKim’s original design. It has been prominently featured in over a dozen films.

 

As the name suggests, this building houses the Mathematics Department. This former home of the Engineering School once featured a full-sized steam locomotive inside. The area around Mathematics Hall is known as the site of the Battle of Harlem Heights. During the American Revolution, George Washington's troops staged an important offensive against the British troops here. Though inconclusive, it revived American morale after defeats in Long Island and at Kip's Bay. A plaque on the Broadway side of the building commemorates the battle. The mathematics and science library here have two distinct and separately maintained collections. The mathematics holdings cover all aspects of pure mathematics, including algebra, number theory, geometry, topology, mathematical statistics, and probability. The library currently subscribes to 250 international mathematics serials. The science collection consists of general and multidisciplinary materials in such areas as the history of science and technology, older scientific periodicals and publications of academies and learned societies.

 

As the name suggests, this building houses the Mathematics Department. This former home of the Engineering School once featured a full-sized steam locomotive inside. The area around Mathematics Hall is known as the site of the Battle of Harlem Heights. During the American Revolution, George Washington’s troops staged an important offensive against the British troops here. Though inconclusive, it revived American morale after defeats in Long Island and at Kip’s Bay. A plaque on the Broadway side of the building commemorates the battle.
The mathematics and science library here have two distinct and separately maintained collections. The mathematics holdings cover all aspects of pure mathematics, including algebra, number theory, geometry, topology, mathematical statistics, and probability. The library currently subscribes to 250 international mathematics serials. The science collection consists of general and multidisciplinary materials in such areas as the history of science and technology, older scientific periodicals and publications of academies and learned societies.

 

Earl Hall is Columbia's religious and community service headquarters. Dedicated in 1902, it is one of the oldest buildings on campus. The University Chaplain and campus ministers have offices here along with more than 50 religious, political, and community service groups. Through these organizations, approximately 850 student volunteers working with Columbia's Community Impact program, serve more than 1,000 people weekly, addressing community needs for tutoring, social service referrals, food, and more.

 

Earl Hall is Columbia’s religious and community service headquarters. Dedicated in 1902, it is one of the oldest buildings on campus. The University Chaplain and campus ministers have offices here along with more than 50 religious, political, and community service groups. Through these organizations, approximately 850 student volunteers working with Columbia’s Community Impact program, serve more than 1,000 people weekly, addressing community needs for tutoring, social service referrals, food, and more.

 

The School of General Studies (GS) and the School of Continuing Education are located in Lewisohn Hall. The School of General Studies is the undergraduate college for nontraditional students who have interrupted their education for at least one year after high school or during college and have chosen to return to higher education to complete a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. Continuing Education students enroll in undergraduate and graduate courses offered by more than 40 academic departments in Arts and Sciences. Lewisohn also houses the Language Resource Center and the Learning Center, a walk-in tutoring facility.

 

The School of General Studies (GS) and the School of Continuing Education are located in Lewisohn Hall.
The School of General Studies is the undergraduate college for nontraditional students who have interrupted their education for at least one year after high school or during college and have chosen to return to higher education to complete a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science.
Continuing Education students enroll in undergraduate and graduate courses offered by more than 40 academic departments in Arts and Sciences.
Lewisohn also houses the Language Resource Center and the Learning Center, a walk-in tutoring facility.

 

Dodge Hall is home to Columbia's School of the Arts (founded in 1965); the Department of Music; the 688-seat Kathryn Bache Miller Theatre; the Gabe M. Weiner Music and Arts Library; the Center for Ethnomusicology; the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies; the Digital Media Center, and the Lifetime Screening Room. The School of the Arts offers Master of Fine Arts degrees in the fields of Film, Theatre, Visual Arts, and Writing, as well as undergraduate majors in Film and Visual Arts and a special program in Creative Writing. The Department of Music, one of the oldest in the country (founded in 1896), offers a range of instruction from doctoral training in composition and musicology to appreciation and criticism of music as a liberal art. The program provides many opportunities to perform and presents a series of concerts and colloquia.

 

Dodge Hall is home to Columbia’s School of the Arts (founded in 1965); the Department of Music; the 688-seat Kathryn Bache Miller Theatre; the Gabe M. Weiner Music and Arts Library; the Center for Ethnomusicology; the LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies; the Digital Media Center, and the Lifetime Screening Room. The School of the Arts offers Master of Fine Arts degrees in the fields of Film, Theatre, Visual Arts, and Writing, as well as undergraduate majors in Film and Visual Arts and a special program in Creative Writing.
The Department of Music, one of the oldest in the country (founded in 1896), offers a range of instruction from doctoral training in composition and musicology to appreciation and criticism of music as a liberal art. The program provides many opportunities to perform and presents a series of concerts and colloquia.

 

The Graduate School of Journalism, located in Journalism Hall, offers an intensive masters degree program with concentrations in broadcast, newspaper, magazine, and new-media journalism. The School is also home to the foremost prizes in journalism, including the Pulitzer Prizes; the Alfred I. duPont–Columbia Awards for broadcast journalism; the National Magazine Awards; the Maria Moors Cabot Prizes for reporting on Latin America; the J. Anthony Lukas Prize for book writing, and the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for magazine photography. The Columbia Journalism Review is published here as well. Journalism Hall was built in 1912 with funds donated by famed publisher Joseph Pulitzer.

 

The Graduate School of Journalism, located in Journalism Hall, offers an intensive masters degree program with concentrations in broadcast, newspaper, magazine, and new-media journalism. The School is also home to the foremost prizes in journalism, including the Pulitzer Prizes; the Alfred I. duPont–Columbia Awards for broadcast journalism; the National Magazine Awards; the Maria Moors Cabot Prizes for reporting on Latin America; the J. Anthony Lukas Prize for book writing, and the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for magazine photography. The Columbia Journalism Review is published here as well. Journalism Hall was built in 1912 with funds donated by famed publisher Joseph Pulitzer.

 

Alfred Lerner Hall, Columbia's student center, serves students' needs conveniently in one location and is a central area of activity on campus. Some of the highlights of the center are: student lounges; two dining venues; copy center; black box theater; pool and game room; 7,000 undergraduate mailboxes; two computer rooms, one allowing 24-hour access; numerous multi-functional event spaces, including a 1,100-seat auditorium; a 400-seat cinema, and offices for administrative services and student organizations. Bernard Tschumi, former dean of the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, in association with Gruzen Samton Architects were responsible for the building design. The architects strove for a facility that featured a modern innovative design, while remaining true to the University's more classic architecture.

 

Alfred Lerner Hall, Columbia’s student center, serves students’ needs conveniently in one location and is a central area of activity on campus. Some of the highlights of the center are: student lounges; two dining venues; copy center; black box theater; pool and game room; 7,000 undergraduate mailboxes; two computer rooms, one allowing 24-hour access; numerous multi-functional event spaces, including a 1,100-seat auditorium; a 400-seat cinema, and offices for administrative services and student organizations.
Bernard Tschumi, former dean of the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, in association with Gruzen Samton Architects were responsible for the building design. The architects strove for a facility that featured a modern innovative design, while remaining true to the University’s more classic architecture.

 

The Columbia University Libraries is one of the ten largest academic library systems in the nation, with holdings of more than 8.2 million volumes in 22 libraries, each supporting a specific academic or professional discipline. Built in 1934, Butler Library houses close to one-third of the Libraries' on-site collections. The Philip L. Milstein Family College Library, floors two through four, serves Columbia's undergraduate students. Of special interest at Butler are the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, which contains more than 600,000 rare books and 28 million manuscripts, and the world-famous Oral History Research Office and collection. LibraryWeb is the online gateway to a wide variety of electronic resources (e.g., E-journals, databases), web-based services (e.g., Interlibrary Loan, Ask Us Now), and contact information for library staff and subject specialists.

 

The Columbia University Libraries is one of the ten largest academic library systems in the nation, with holdings of more than 8.2 million volumes in 22 libraries, each supporting a specific academic or professional discipline. Built in 1934, Butler Library houses close to one-third of the Libraries’ on-site collections. The Philip L. Milstein Family College Library, floors two through four, serves Columbia’s undergraduate students. Of special interest at Butler are the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, which contains more than 600,000 rare books and 28 million manuscripts, and the world-famous Oral History Research Office and collection. LibraryWeb is the online gateway to a wide variety of electronic resources (e.g., E-journals, databases), web-based services (e.g., Interlibrary Loan, Ask Us Now), and contact information for library staff and subject specialists.

 

Hamilton Hall, an original McKim, Mead, and White building, is home to Columbia College, one of the most prestigious undergraduate institutions in the world. The College, which prizes its renowned Core Curriculum, offers programs of study leading to the B.A. in 61 subjects and has 5 dual degree programs as well as a joint degree program with the Juilliard School of Music. The College Dean's office and the Undergraduate Admissions Office for Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science are located here. In addition, the building houses the department of Slavic languages.

 

Hamilton Hall, an original McKim, Mead, and White building, is home to Columbia College, one of the most prestigious undergraduate institutions in the world. The College, which prizes its renowned Core Curriculum, offers programs of study leading to the B.A. in 61 subjects and has 5 dual degree programs as well as a joint degree program with the Juilliard School of Music. The College Dean’s office and the Undergraduate Admissions Office for Columbia College and the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science are located here. In addition, the building houses the department of Slavic languages.

 

The Northwest Corner Building (NWC) houses faculty offices, classrooms, and research facilities for the disciplines of chemistry, biology, engineering and physics. Serving as a physical and intellectual bridge, linking laboratories and maximizing the ready sharing and exchange of ideas, resources and information, the new building will enhance the existing collaborations and stimulate new ones.

 

The Northwest Corner Building (NWC) houses faculty offices, classrooms, and research facilities for the disciplines of chemistry, biology, engineering and physics. Serving as a physical and intellectual bridge, linking laboratories and maximizing the ready sharing and exchange of ideas, resources and information, the new building will enhance the existing collaborations and stimulate new ones.

 

William C. Warren Hall is home to two legal advocacy programs run by Columbia Law School: the Child Advocacy Clinic and the Prisoners & Family Rights Clinic.

 

William C. Warren Hall is home to two legal advocacy programs run by Columbia Law School: the Child Advocacy Clinic and the Prisoners & Family Rights Clinic.

 

[Photos and text courtesy of Columbia University Visitors Center]

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